Traffic Inbox: Dangerous stretch of Central Avenue in Kissimmee

By Ryan Harper, Real Time Traffic Expert
Last Updated: Monday, October 16, 2017, 12:57 PM EDT

In this week’s Traffic Inbox, we are talking about a portion of Central Avenue in Kissimmee, specifically between Columbia Street and Donegan Avenue.

  • Residents: Portion of Central Avenue in Kissimmee as dangerous to navigate on foot
  • City of Kissimmee aware of issues and doing study
  • ConnectKissimmee.com

One of the area's residents, Carol, wrote to us this week regarding the area. She said:

"I can't tell you how many near-misses I have seen and been involved with regarding pedestrians. More people will get hurt out here if nothing is done. Are any changes in the works?"

Upon hearing that, we were off to Kissimmee where we found Mikey's Pizzeria. The restaurant has hugged a portion of Central Avenue just south of Columbia Street for the last 20 years. Some people are quite familiar with Central Avenue's shortcomings.

"I had a couple of run-ins with people, pedestrians that I had to literally stop, because they weren't looking,” said Janira, a worker at Mikey's. "And it was my right-of-way. It's scary!"

The City of Kissimmee knows all too well that changes are needed and are in fact doing a study for all of Central Avenue. In fact, officials say that area needs the most attention.

"There's basically no pedestrian facilities,” said Randy Schrader, City Planner for the City of Kissimmee. "And there's no transit through there right now. We just really want to upgrade the whole system, starting with the north as being our primary focus."

The project includes partnership with MetroPlan Orlando and the Florida Department of Transportation with the vision of transforming the area's commuter options.

"We envision the corridor as being a transportation hub, so to speak, for the medical district, because it is the primary spine," said Schrader.

The project is still in the transportation study phase after which it will move into design and construction -- with still possibly a five-year timeline before actual road work begins. For the meantime, drivers and walkers alike will have to be on their toes.

"There are a lot more pedestrians here than cars," said Janira. "And they don't really pay attention. So we need some type of way to know that they are crossing...or just slow down!"

You can also go to connectkissimmee.com for more information.

Thanks for your question Carol! If you at home have a traffic issue or problem you want solved go to www.mynews13.com/trafficinbox and fill out the simple form.